Tuesday, November 27, 2007

KAR Moonbat Fun Quiz

Try to guess which one of these excerpts was written by an extremely-tightly-wound-tilting-at-windmills-cryptofeminist-pseudointellectual-quasi-academic-perpetually-aggrieved-race-pimp, and which one is a parody that I made up myself. The answer may surprise you.

BLURB #1:

RACE AND ETHNICITY IN VEGAN ANALYSIS

I know race is a social construction, but there have been obvious consequences to this construction. This is what I investigate, as it relates to animal rights and veganism. Her response is nothing new to me; it's just rare that I have children writing me. I find it frustrating that there are many USA people (mostly white identified class privileged— not to say that she is, but yes, I’m making a huge assumption) engaged in veganism and animal rights that ONLY want to deal with animal rights from a USA "animal rights only" framework (in a safe little bubble). They are leaving out other interlocking systemic oppressions– mainly classism , globalization, neocolonialism, racism and 1st Worldism.


BLURB #2:

"ICE AGE": SETTING FEMALE CHARACTERS BACK A FEW MILLENNIA...

Ice Age is one of the worst children’s films I’ve ever seen in terms of gender portrayal.

In a nutshell, Ice Age is a classic all-male buddy adventure in which a motley group of guys of different prehistoric species bring a (male) baby back to his human clan. The human clan is weirdly also all male except for the baby’s mom, who sacrifices her life in the beginning of the movie in order to set up their great adventure. The lack of female main characters is pretty standard fare, so it’s the “mom’s sacrifice” scene that truly places this film in a class of its own.

How many (theoretical) female characters have to give their lives to set up some back-story for male protagonists? I hate to even touch the question…


Scroll down for answer.





























ANSWER: Trick question! They are both real. And like some sort of masochistic psychiatric archaeologist, I have unearthed yet another rich source of material that I'll probably forget about within a week.

Though one does have to admire the zeal the second author brings to the fight for the equality of prehistoric female cartoon animals.

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