Thursday, September 04, 2008

All You Need Is a Strong Heart and Nerves of Steel

To sum up today in the life of the blog-o-sphere:


RIGHTY BLOGGERS: Sarah Palin is the greatest VP candidate ever.


LEFTY BLOGGERS: Sarah Palin has become death, the destroyer of worlds; the Antichrist; a far far right wing extremist who hates you and everything you stand for and will plunge this country into a thousand years of darkness. And her vicious and mean spirited speech last night is proof that she is PMSing. Trust me. I'm a feminist.


TIM O'BRIEN ("THE BLOG HOUSE"): DER DER DUH DYYYYYARARRRRRRRRRRR! *drool*


LEARNEDFOOT: Who gives a shit? Let's talk Vegas, baby!


Since table games other than blackjack aren't available in Minnesota in much the same way executive experience is not available in the Senate, I've been doing a copious amount of research on gaming. If I'm going to take a $750 bankroll to Sin City come October, I'm not just going to give it away by making stupid bets or mistakes based on ignorance of the game. I've been reading tutorials and tips about playing the most popular table games. If I'm going to let my odds work on the come out roll, or bet with the bank, its only going to be because I determine that the house edge is low enough vis a vis the payout.


Speaking of which, I came across a very interesting table. If you're a slot jockey, you may want to rethink your habit:







(From here.)


Craps is statistically the "safest" game to play (are you listening, Minnesota gaming regulators???!!!!) while slots are for dumb people. Of course, slots are easier, since all you have to do is sit there, put in your token and push a button, whereas you tend to hold on to money much longer playing craps or blackjack, since the player faces a lower house edge and often can have some impact on the outcome of the game. And while you are always more likely to lose than to win (the casinos do need to stay in business, after all), you are always better off choosing a game over which the individual has some control, rather than hoping that your bankroll outlasts the statistical inevitabilies of a preprogrammed device.


Something to think about.


(Even if you're not into gaming.)


(If you know what I mean.)

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